Money supply


Money supply
M1-A: Currency plus demand deposits
M1-B: M1-A plus other checkable deposits. The New York Times Financial Glossary
M2: M1-B plus overnight repos, money market funds, savings, and small (less than $100M) time deposits. The New York Times Financial Glossary
M3: M-2 plus large time deposits and term repos. The New York Times Financial Glossary
L: M-3 plus other liquid assets. The New York Times Financial Glossary

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money supply ˈmoney ˌsupply also ˈmoney ˌstock noun [singular] ECONOMICS
1. the amount of money in an economy at a particular time, and the speed with which it is used:

• policies which are geared to stabilizing the rate of growth of the money supply

2. M0/​M1/​M2 etc different measures of a country's money supply depending on the types of money they include, such as cash, banks (= money held by banks), commercial paper (= borrowing for short periods of time by organizations) etc:

• The Fed said its narrow M1 measure of the money supply fell $400 million in the week ended Sept. 9, while the broader M3 measure fell $500 million.

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   The total stock of money in an economy, including notes and coins, loans, credit and other liquid instruments. There are various definitions of money supply in each country, but in all economies the definitions gradually range from narrow, which usually includes just cash in circulation and demand deposits at commercial banks, through to the broadest measure which includes money market funds.

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money supply UK US noun [U] (also money stock) ECONOMICS
the total amount of money in a particular economy at a particular time: »

Growth in the money supply is no longer a reliable guide to monetary conditions.


Financial and business terms. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

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